You’re fucking right, Joe!

March 23rd, 2010 Posted in Uncategorized

biden
Sorry, I love Joe Biden AND I talk that way myself. So I don’t have a problem with it. Give ’em hell, Joe. And thank you and everyone else who got us the new health care bill.

Where was I?

Filling out paperwork.

Because I’m a fed now and that’s what we do. It’s insane. I have to fill out a separate form for every person I help with the 2010 Census. I’m sure I could have designed a better form, one that could be used to cover everyone helped per shift.

I could have also designed a better payroll form, which I just learned are kicked back 15% of the time because someone filled them out wrong. I take that back. I’m looking at it and this one isn’t that bad really, the mistakes people are making are careless mistakes, it’s not a design issue. I guess the thing is, now that we know which sections people aren’t being careful about, maybe larger bold-faced type … and this is the most boring post ever, isn’t it? I’m done. Sorry.

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  1. 6 Responses to “You’re fucking right, Joe!”

  2. By Karen on Mar 23, 2010

    You crack me up!! LOL!!

  3. By Cara on Mar 23, 2010

    Love Joe too, and I’m from the SOUTH, where the morons in office here have filed a lawsuit against the health care reform bill. You CANNOT imagine how outraged I am, and to tell you the truth, I may just move away from here — where I’ve lived all my life. Just awful, and I apologize to those who think EVERYONE in Alabama is a moron — a few of us aren’t, but sad to say, it seems the majority are! Big sigh of disgust!

  4. By Greg on Mar 23, 2010

    Cara, my understanding is that about 35 states are presently planning to contest the health care plan on constitutional grounds.

    Although I have tentative hopes for health care, I don’t believe that the states are showing bad faith in respect to their point of objection.

    Right now, it is supposed to be unconstitutional for someone to force another to purchase their product. Regrettably, I’m not a talented writer, but if I wrote a book, I couldn’t force other people to buy my book, given the way the Constitution is arranged.

    I believe the Supreme Court will err in favor of the health care plan. The federal government will use the commerce clause and say that interstate commerce gives them the authority to demand that states accept the federal regulation.

    And even though I’m mildly hopeful about the plan, I think we need to recognize that at least 59% of Americans (according to modest polls) are against the plan. This, of course, is why it was necessary to be so creative with parliamentary procedure, to avoid a straight up-or-down vote. The likelihood of it having passed on and up-or-down vote was slim.

    Inasmuch as insurance companies will go out of business in about 3 years, my concern is that we model our new system on the most successful government-run health care plan. For example, France’s is better than the UK’s. Singapore’s is better than France’s. So I hope we choose the single-payer system that works the best, rather than the one that is the worst.

  5. By Stacy Horn on Mar 24, 2010

    Those polls are a result of the unconscionable spread of misinformation like “death panels.” When polled about the individual elements of the plan, people support them.

    I’d love to hear more about Singapore’s, I know nothing about it!

  6. By Greg on Mar 24, 2010

    Stacy, I didn’t mean to imply that Singapore necessarily had the best system in the world. There are literally dozens of government health care systems throughout Scandinavia, the rest of Europe, and the Far East.

    Almost every Scandinavian country has a different government system. Singapore’s system works very well for them. All medical care is provided, but one must pay for the hospital accommodation and other particulars oneself. The operations, the medicine and specifically medical concerns are provided by the government.

    People must understand that if we choose a bad government system, we will be in a worse system than what we presently have. Simply because taxpayers pay the bill, it does not guarantee a superior system.

    So we must be very wise and make sure that the system we choose actually is not a devolution over the efficiency of our present one.

    As we must rely on politicians for selections, I remain guardedly pessimistic. Politics, by and large, is human activity at its most mediocre.

    You can imagine what your book would look like if it had to be written by a committee of diverse, opposite, and antagonistic voices.

    In the Olympics, everyone gets an A, but in politics if you can come up with a C you have done a very good day’s work.

    Incidentally, I agree that the “death panel” comment was propaganda. However, it needs to be understood that it was fanciful to imagine that robust opposition to the health care plan was based on remarks such as Palin’s. (Some of the states bringing suit are blue states.)

    In Texas, as in most Southern states, conservatism is as pervasive as liberalism in New York City. And I can assure you that there are many very thoughtful people on the right who present very good arguments against this plan.

    I happen to lean in favor of the plan. At the same time, I am troubled by the way it ultimately passed. I would have liked to see the plan capture most Democratic voters’ approval, half of swing voters, and fourth of Republican voters, and then pass Congress on a straight up-or-down vote.

    In any event I think the important matter at this juncture is to find out the government-run plans throughout the world that function the best and use them as a basis for trying to come up with a model that is most suitable for us.

  7. By Stacy Horn on Mar 26, 2010

    The death panel was simply the most dramatic, egregious example. There are many, more subtle examples.

    And yes, there were thoughtful and good arguments about the plan, which were incorporated.

    As usual, I’m tired of the how the national conversation has devolved and the thoughtful conservatives were quiet when they should have spoken up.

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